Read the Essay Kacy Hill Wrote About Being a Creative Woman - Beat Magazine

Read the Essay Kacy Hill Wrote About Being a Creative Woman

If there’s one thing we’re sure of, it’s that Kacy Hill is incredible. Over the past few years, Hill has been on a slow accent to stardom, on her own terms. Her striking debut album, Like A Woman, is executive produced by actual Kanye West and features collaborations with producers like Stuart Price.

Hill first showed up on West’s radar when she performed as a member of the Vanessa Beecroft-curated performance troupe for his Yeezus tour. Kanye signed her to his G.O.O.D. Music/Def Jam imprint and the result is an album of reflective tracks on which Hill’s ethereal vocals float over pulsing beats.

Here, Hill shares some of her thoughts and wisdom on being a creative woman:

“Are you sure?”

As a young woman, almost every decision I’ve made in the face of others has been met with a degree of doubt as to whether or not I really know what I want. In the past, I’ve entertained it enough to argue with my own intuition and perception of reality – so much so that I spent three years of my professional life arguing with myself about what my purpose is and if I have even enough of my own identity to be an artist. Especially as a woman, everyone seems to have an opinion about who I should be, and they do their best to boil me down to one adjective. Still today, it seems to be a whole lot easier to digest that one adjective than taking the time to understand that I am a woman with strength, sex appeal, ability, sensitivity, confidence, insecurities, etc., etc.. In reducing myself, or any other woman, to a single adjective, I find myself limiting how much I believe I am capable of accomplishing.

Over this past summer, I reached a point where I could not think of one single thing that I was proud of. I spent time looking inward, and realized that – regardless of how much of my time, love, and individual creative energy I put into a thing – I felt constantly unsure of my decisions. I doubted my taste in music so much that I would wait for someone else to like a record before I could even decide to like it! What I know is that this does not stem from a lifetime of being unsure of myself (I spent most of my growing up years with crooked teeth, mismatched knee high socks, and pigtails while I rollerbladed and did not give a single shit about what any other person could have thought about me); it has grown from years of people (especially men) reinforcing their own doubt in my ability to know what I want.

In reducing myself, or any other woman, to a single adjective, I find myself limiting how much I believe I am capable of accomplishing.

So, in continuing to become the woman I want to be, I am striving to believe in my own abilities and drown out the “are you sure”’s, because if I gave an answer, I am sure. As women, I think we are so much more sure of ourselves than we let on, and we can only benefit from silencing the doubters.

This feature is taken from BEAT issue #23 – get your copy here!